vegan Archive

Tomatillo Avocado Salsa, A Recipe from Kelly Myers of Xico

Last week, I had the pleasure of attending an educational tasting event at Xico, a delightful Portland restaurant that specializes in seasonal and regional Mexican cuisine.

We learned about the art and process of transforming corn kernels into fresh, hot tortillas.

We learned about (and tasted!) the difference between Mezcal and Tequila.

Finally, learned how to make Xico’s Tomatillo Avocado Salsa. This salsa is remarkably simple and comes together in minutes. And it tastes so, so, so good. (I could drink this salsa. Seriously.)

Kelly Myers of Xico

In the end, I left Xico with a happy belly, full of warm tortillas and fresh salsas. I also left with a better understanding of traditional and authentic Mexican cuisine. I was so impressed with Kelly and her staff, and their thoughtful approach to food. (For example, did you know that Xico is the only restaurant in Portland making tortillas from corn kernels? Everyone else uses masa.)

Thanks to Chef Kelly Myers and the Xico staff for being fantastic hosts! I learned so much and I can’t wait to go back.

Kelly graciously shared her recipe for Tomatillo Avocado Salsa, and I thought it was too god not to share. :)

Tomatillo Avocado Salsa
Yields 3 1/2 cups

8 oz. tomatillos, rough chopped
6 large epazote leaves, or substitute a small handful of cilantro leaves
2 small cloves of garlic
1/4 cup chopped white onion
1-2 serrano chiles, with seeds, roughly chopped
Salt, to taste
1 small ripe Hass avocado
1/2 cup water, approximately

Put all ingredients except the water in a blender and puree.
Thin as desired with water and adjust the seasoning.

Buckwheat Soba Salad with Snow Peas and Radishes

Did you know that the word ‘soba’ is the Japanese name for ‘buckwheat’?

And did you know that buckwheat isn’t really wheat at all?

In fact, buckwheat comes from an entirely different botanical family. Buckwheat is actually in the same family as sorrel, knotweed, and rhubarb.

You learn something new everyday! I think this information is amazing. Who knew that buckwheat was related to rhubarb?! (I certainly did not!)

As for the recipe? It’s light, it’s seasonal, and it’s perfect for picnics, BBQ’s, and weeknight dinners in the backyard.

Buckwheat Soba Salad with Snow Peas and Radishes


  • 1 package of buckwheat soba noodles
  • 1 cup fresh snow peas
  • 4 green onions, diced
  • 6-8 radishes, sliced thinly
  • Sesame seeds
  • 2 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 1.5 tablespoons Ponzu (or lemon/lime juice)
  • 1.5 tablespoons sesame oil
  • 1 teaspoon agave syrup (or brown sugar)
  • 1 teaspoon seasoned rice vinegar


  1. Cook the soba noodles according to the package directions. Once cooked, rinse with cold water and chill until use.
  2. Mix together soy sauce, ponzu (or citrus), sesame oil, agave, and rice vinegar. Taste, and adjust seasonings as needed. (I personally like a lot of citrus, so I used ponzu and lime juice.)
  3. Toss together the noodles, snow peas, sliced radishes, and green onions. Drizzle the soy dressing over the salad, and toss to coat. Be careful not over-do it on the sauce (this salad’s beauty is in it’s lightness and simplicity). Garnish with sesame seeds. Serve chilled.

Lemon Basil Hummus

Despite all of my best efforts to simplify my life, I must be honest with myself that my life is not, in fact, simple.

No, it’s quite the opposite. Mind you, I am not complaining. My life may be busy, but it is busy and full of wonderful things. I am blessed.

In times such as these, I find myself relying on the simplest of recipes. You know, the kind of recipes that call for very few ingredients and take very little time or energy to throw together.

Hummus is probably my favorite of all my busytime recipes. (I just made up that word and I rather like it. Busytimes!) It’s comforting and nourishing. It can be made a million different ways, with a million different flavor combinations.

It is the best snack food.

Of all the hummus variations I’ve tried lately, I think this is my favorite. It’s bright and refreshing, full of flavor and lemony zing. A big thank you to Bean a Foodie for the idea!

Lemon and Basil Hummuse | Rosemarried

Lemon Basil Hummus


  • 2 cans chickpeas, rinsed and drained
  • 1 heaping tablespoon tahini sauce*
  • The juice of 1 lemon
  • Salt & pepper, to taste
  • 1 clove or garlic
  • 1 heaping cup of basil leaves, stems removed
  • 1/2 cup olive oil
  • *Note: if using straight tahini paste, mix vigorously with a few tablespoons of water until the paste is smoothy, creamy, and lighter in color.


  1. Place all ingredients (except the olive oil) into a food processor. Pulse to combine.
  2. While the food processor is running, slowly drizzle in the olive oil, stopping occasionally to scrape down the sides of the bowl. Continue adding oil and blend until the hummus is smooth and creamy (or until it reaches desired consistency). Note: if you want to use less oil, you may substitute a few tablespoons of water for olive oil.
  3. Taste, and adjust seasonings if necessary. Garnish with a drizzle of olive oil, a sprinkle of sea salt, and a basil leaf. If not consuming immediately, store hummus in an airtight container in the fridge. Will keep for a week (or more).


Adapted from Bean a Foodie

Roasted Cauliflower Steaks with Smoky Tomato Sauce: Food Bloggers Against Hunger

No child should go hungry in America, yet 1 in 4 U.S. kids don’t know where their next meal will come from.”The Giving Table

For many of us, it’s hard to wrap our brains around the fact that there is a real and present hunger problem in the United States. We are an affluent and independent country and we have an abundance of food. Yet, somehow, 1 in 4 kids in the US do not know where their next meal will come from.

This is a tragedy.

Last week, I watched a documentary film called A Place at the Table and my eyes were opened. I knew that food insecurity issues existed in the US, but this documentary really digs into the issues of food and hunger in our country. The film states that while charities are non-profits are good and beneficial, that only a change in government policies will truly change the tide. We need better food policies, period.

Which brings me to this post. Today, I am joining the voices of a host of other food bloggers who are taking a stand against hunger.

With our collective voice, we acknowledge the problem and pledge to be a part of the solution.

Food Bloggers Against Hunger

While preparing for this post, I read that people on food stamps are allocated $4 per day for food. I decided to go to the grocery store with $8 in my pocket ($4 for myself and $4 for my husband) to see what I could make. I wanted to avoid processed foods, and focus on real and whole foods. Let me tell you, it was not easy. I did manage to get all the ingredients for this recipe for $8 (save for the few pantry ingredients I had on hand, such as olive oil, salt, and pepper.) but I had to be creative. (Luckily, organic cauliflower was on sale!)

The sad reality is that real food is not affordable. Fruits and vegetables are expensive, chips and soda are not. This is partially due to the fact that corn, soy, and other commodity crops are heavily subsidized. These filler crops are then turned into chips, crackers, cookies, and other processed foods. These foods are full of empty calories, and are largely devoid of nutrition.

It’s a broken system, but it can be changed.

Raise your voice, take a stand, and advocate for the hungry. Here are a few ways you can take part:

Take 30 seconds and send a letter to congress asking them to support anti-hunger legislation.

Watch the film, A Place at The Table: on iTunes, on Amazon, or at a theater near you.

Cauliflower Steak with Red Pepper and Tomato Sauce from Rosemarried

Roasted Cauliflower Steaks with Smoky Tomato Sauce and Parsley Gremolata

Serving Size: 2


  • 1 (15 oz) can plain tomato sauce
  • 1 (15 oz) can fire roasted tomatoes
  • 1 red bell pepper
  • 1 handful of fresh flat leaf parsley
  • 3 cloves of garlic, peeled and minced
  • 1 small yellow onion, diced
  • 1 head of cauliflower
  • 1 tablespoon slivered almonds, toasted
  • Olive oil
  • Salt and pepper
  • The juice of 1/2 a lemon


  1. First, roast the bell pepper. If you have a gas stove, you can roast the bell pepper, using tongs, over the burner. Rotate the pepper and hold close to the flame, until it is blacked on all sides. (If you do not have a gas stove, you can place the bell pepper under the broiler and rotate until all sides are blackened.) Once the pepper is blackened, place in a bowl and cover with plastic wrap. Allow to sit for at least ten minutes (this will help loosen the skin and soften/cook the pepper). Remove from the bowl and peel off the blackened skin. Roughly chop the pepper, removing the seeds and stem. Set aside.
  2. Remove leaves and trim stem end of cauliflower, leaving core intact. Place the cauliflower core-side down on a cutting board. Using a large knife, slice cauliflower into half inch “steaks” from center of cauliflower (some florets will break loose; reserve for another use). Depending on the size of the cauliflower, you can get 2-4 “steaks” out of one head.
  3. Preheat oven to 400°. Pour 1 tablespoon olive oil into a large cast iron (or ovenproof) skillet and place in the oven to preheat. Once the skillet is hot, place cauliflower steaks in the skillet and return it to the oven. Cook steaks until golden brown and tender, turning once, about 5-6 minutes per side.
  4. Meanwhile, make the tomato sauce. Heat 1 tablespoon of olive oil in a skillet over medium heat. Add 1-2 cloves of minced garlic, and the chopped onion. Cook for 2-3 minutes. Add in the roasted red pepper, tomato sauce, and fire roasted tomatoes. Season with salt and pepper. Cook the sauce for 15-20 minutes. (Note: I used an immersion blender to puree the sauce, but this was just a personal preference. It’s totally fine to leave the sauce chunky!)
  5. Lastly, make the gremolata. Roughly chop the parsley and toasted almonds. Toss with 1 clove of garlic (minced), a drizzle of olive oil, and the juice of 1/2 a lemon. Season with salt, pepper, and red chili flakes.
  6. Divide tomato sauce among plates or bowls. Place 1 cauliflower steak on each plate; spoon the gremolata over the top of each steak. Helpful hint: a few slices of crusty bread or baguette work nicely for sopping up extra tomato sauce.


Adapted from Epicurious

Spring Sandwich with Avocado, Radish, and Greens.

And just like that, everything is new again.

The chill of winter has lifted and life is springing forth from the ground. I see it all around me and I feel it in my bones.

Spring has come.

With the spring comes change. For me, this time of year means many different things; it is a time of celebration, a time of plenty, and a time of joy. It is a time for farmer’s markets and radishes and ramps and spring greens. It is a time for opening up the windows, a time for letting the sunlight and fresh air in.


For some of us, this season is also a time of remembrance. A time of fasting and prayer, in preparation for the death and resurrection of Christ. For the past few years, Nich and I have observed Great Lent (aka Orthodox Lent). For six weeks, we abstain from meat, dairy, and alcohol, in preparation for the Easter Feast (Pascha).

I am only one week into Great Lent, but I already feel the effects of fasting. I feel focused and rested, contemplative and clear-minded. I feel hopeful and grateful. And yet, I am struck by the realization that I have so much. I have the freedom to abstain from luxuries such as meat, cheese, and wine. I know that there are many (many) people in this world who aren’t afforded this choice. They abstain because they do not have.

It is a sobering realization that I do not take lightly. Such is the nature of this season – it is a time of hope and of heaviness.

All that said, here’s to spring and all that it brings.

Spring Sandwich with Radishes, Avocado, and Spring Greens

Serving Size: Serves 2


  • 1 large ripe avocado
  • 1 small red onion
  • 1 heaping cup spring greens (baby kale, arugula, spinach, chard, lettuce, etc.), washed and patted dry.
  • 3 radishes
  • Slices of whole wheat sourdough (or other bread of your choice)
  • Whole grain mustard
  • Red wine vinegar
  • Olive oil
  • Lemon juice
  • Salt & pepper


  1. First, I like to ‘quick pickle’ the red onion. You don’t have to pickle the red onion, but I think it adds a nice vinegary kick to the sandwich. To pickle the onion, first peel the onion and slice 1/4 of the onion into very thin slices (reserve the rest for another use). Place the onion slices in a small bowl and sprinkle 1/2 teaspoon of kosher salt over the onions. Pour red wine vinegar over the onions, just enough to cover and stir to coat. Allow to sit for 15 minutes (or more).
  2. Meanwhile, assemble the sandwiches. In a small bowl, toss the greens with a bit of olive oil, salt, and pepper. (Be careful not to overdress, use only a little olive oil and lemon juice.)
  3. Spread a thin layer of whole grain mustard onto a piece of bread. Top with half of the greens. Slice the avocado in half, and cut the half into thin slices (reserving the other half for a second sandwich). Arrange the avocado slices atop the greens.
  4. Using a knife or mandoline, slice the radishes into very thin rounds. Place radish slices atop the avocado.
  5. Sprinkle a few of the pickled red onions atop the sandwich. Season with a bit of salt and freshly ground pepper. Top with another slice of bread, or enjoy as an open-faced sandwich.

Roasted Lemon and Shallot Chutney

Five years ago I moved from Los Angeles, CA, to Portland, OR.

It was quite possibly one of the best decisions I’ve ever made, for so many reasons. It didn’t take long for me to fall in love with this city, this state, the atmosphere, the people, all of it. I really love it here.

But it is precisely this time of year that I find myself missing California. I don’t miss the traffic, the smog, the crowds, or the stress. Really, I just miss the California sunshine and the California citrus. For all of Oregon’s greatness, we don’t have much of either of those two things this time of year. (On the other hand, we do have a lot of clouds, rain, kale, and squash. I like all of those things, but I tire of them easily.)

Last week, my mom gave me a really nice gift. My parents recently went to visit my aunt and uncle in Palm Springs, and my mom brought back a bag of Meyer Lemons from my aunt’s lemon tree. She was kind enough to give me a handful of the Meyer lemons, and it made my entire week. (I’m not kidding.)

I knew I needed to make something special with these Meyer lemons, so I decided to make a version of this roasted lemon chutney. The chutney incorporates all parts of the lemon, and the roasting process mellows the bitterness of the lemon. This is a simple and rustic chutney, and I would highly recommend that you slather it on some crusty bread with a dollop of soft cheese.

Roasted Lemon and Shallot Chutney


  • 1 large shallot (or 2 small shallots), roughly chopped
  • 3 Meyer lemons, plus 2 tablespoons of lemon juice
  • 1/4 cup olive oil (plus a bit more for brushing)
  • Sea salt & freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 teaspoons honey
  • Optional: 2 tablespoons chopped basil or mint


  1. Preheat the oven to 400F.
  2. Wash the lemons and slice into 1/4 inch thick rounds (discard the end pieces). Use a knife (or fingers) to remove the seeds from the lemon slices. Place the lemon slices on the baking sheet and brush with a bit of olive. Sprinkle a touch of sea salt over the lemons.
  3. In a small bowl, toss the chopped shallots with olive oil, salt, and pepper. Place on a separate baking sheet (or in a small baking pan). Roast the shallots until they are tender and lightly browned, around 15 minutes. Once the shallots are cooked, remove them from the oven and set aside until needed.
  4. While the shallots are cooking, roast the lemons (on a separate oven rack). Cook the lemons for ten minutes, and then turn them over and continue roasting until they are very tender and are beginning to brown (about 20 minutes total cooking time). Remove the lemons from the oven and set aside to cool.
  5. Once the lemons shallots are cooled, transfer them to a food processor. Add in the olive oil, honey, salt, pepper, and lemon juice. Add a bit at a time and pulse until the mixture comes together (it will look creamy, with a few chunks). Taste and adjust the seasonings until the chutney is to your liking. Allow to sit for 2 hours before serving, to allow the flavors to meld. If adding in chopped herbs, stir them into the chutney right before serving.
  6. The chutney can be stored in an airtight container in the fridge for up to a week. Enjoy!

Vegan Kale Caesar Salad with Hazelnuts and Meyer Lemon

Fun fact: did you know that the Caesar salad originated in Mexico? An Italian immigrant named Caesar Cardini moved to Tijuana in the 1920′s and opened a few restaurants. It is rumored that he invented the now-famous salad one evening when he ran out of his usual salad dressing ingredients and was forced to make up a salad dressing on the spot. The salad was a huge hit, and its popularity quickly spread to the United States. Nowadays, you can find Caesar salads on menus across the country, from high end restaurants to fast food chains.

So, there’s your history lesson for the day!

What I would like to do today is re-write a little bit of culinary history. I would like to reclaim the Caesar salad. Don’t get me wrong: I love a good Caesar. I love it when the lettuce is fresh and crisp, when the dressing is made from scratch (and with love!). I love the salty brine of the anchovies. The crunch of the croutons. The bite of the garlic.

But let’s be honest… when was the last time you had a good Caesar salad? Caesar salads have devolved into convenience store food; pre-packaged in plastic containers filled with with rubbery white chicken (complete with fake char marks!), soggy croutons, and wilted lettuce. Most modern-day Caesar’s resemble nothing of Cardini’s 1920′s invention.

As for my version of the Caesar, it is also a far cry from Cardini’s original recipe. My version is vegan, which means it contains no eggs or anchovies. While I love a classic Caesar dressing, there’s something about the vegan version that I adore. It actually tastes like Caesar dressing – it’s creamy, briny, peppery, and garlicky. The key to this dressing is the capers (and the caper brine), as they add that certain fishy/briny element that we all know and love in a classic Caesar.

This dressing is really simple to make, it’s flavorful, and it’s healthy. And since I want to start my new year off on the right foot, I thought I’d share this recipe with you all. I’ve been making a version of this dressing for years, but in the past I’ve made it with olive oil, almonds, and romaine lettuce. I decided to class up the recipe a little, and make it with dinosaur kale, hazelnuts, Meyer lemons, and hazelnut oil. I couldn’t be happier with the results, it’s a delightful winter salad.

One last funny tidbit, and then I’ll post the recipe. I must confess, I added some roast chicken to the salad. It completely negated the veganness of it, but oh well. It was delicious. That’s the best thing about this salad, there’s a lot of wiggle room. You can change and edit it as you see fit.

Vegan Kale Caesar Salad with Hazelnuts and Meyer Lemon


  • Salad ingredients:
  • 1 large bunch Dinosaur Kale (also called Black Kale or Lacinato Kale)
  • 1/3 cup toasted hazelnuts, roughly chopped
  • 1 tablespoon capers
  • 1 handful fresh flat-leaf parsley, roughly chopped
  • Optional salad ingredients:
  • Red bell pepper, sliced thinly
  • Carrots, sliced thinly
  • Meyer lemon zest
  • Garlic croutons
  • Protein: Tempeh, Tofu, Grilled salmon, chicken, etc.
  • For the vegan Caesar dressing:
  • 1/3 cup toasted hazelnuts
  • 2-3 cloves garlic, peeled and crushed
  • 3/4 cup silken tofu
  • 2 tablespoons hazelnut oil (or olive oil)
  • 3 tablespoons fresh Meyer lemon juice
  • 1 heaping tablespoon capers
  • 4 teaspoons caper brine
  • 1 teaspoon red wine vinegar
  • Sea salt & freshly ground black pepper


  1. To make the dressing, first pulse the hazelnuts in a food processor until they are finely ground (1 minute or so).
  2. Add in the silken tofu, lemon juice, capers, caper brine, garlic, salt, pepper, and red wine vinegar. Process until the mixture is thoroughly blended.
  3. While the food processor is on, slowly pour in the hazelnut (or olive) oil, until the dressing is thick and creamy. (Note: There is no need to worry about the dressing being completely ‘smooth’. I happen to like the nutty texture, so I blend until it reaches the texture I like. There is a lot of flexibility with this dressing, just make it how you like it!)
  4. Once you have mixed the dressing, taste and adjust seasonings as needed. Add in salt and a healthy dose of freshly ground black pepper. If the dressing doesn’t taste briny enough, add in a bit more of the caper brine. Set aside.
  5. To assemble the salad, slice the kale into thin strips with a sharp knife. Toss the kale with the dressing and any other ingredients (carrots, bell pepper, croutons, protein, etc.). If the dressing is too thick, feel free to dilute with a bit of water or more oil.
  6. Sprinkle the salad with remaining hazelnuts and capers, and season with a few grinds of black pepper.
  7. Serve immediately, or store in the refrigerator in an airtight container for up to 24 hours. If you are not serving the salad immediately, I recommend squeezing a bit of fresh lemon over the salad prior to serving. If you have extra dressing, it will keep in the fridge for up to a week.