vegetarian Archive

Zucchini and Corn Skillet Sauté

So far, I’ve craved the following things during pregnancy: apricots, deli macaroni salad, blueberries,  cookies n’ cream ice cream, chocolate chip cookies, macaroni and cheese, french onion dip (and potato chips), grapes, s’mores, brownies (from a box), peaches and cottage cheese, and cereal. (I’ve been eating a lot of cereal.)

Sadly, there have been zero vegetables on the cravings list. If it weren’t for my garden, I probably wouldn’t be eating any vegetables whatsoever! It’s not that vegetables sound bad, I just don’t have a strong inclination towards them. I could take them or leave them. (I just want fruit. And ice cream. And cereal.)

Thankfully, my garden won’t let me get away with a fruit/cereal/ice cream diet. My garden is exploding with summer produce right now – cherry tomatoes, zucchini, basil, snap peas, lettuce, spinach, cilantro, carrots, green onions, etc – and I can’t let it all go to waste. So, when I do finally get around to cooking and/or eating vegetables, I am reminded of the fact that I really do love them. Especially in the peak of summer season, there are just so many wonderful vegetable options. They’re bright and crisp, full of flavor and nutrients.

So, even if I don’t particularly crave veggies, I’ll keep eating them because I know they’re good for me and the baby (and my garden keeps pumping out more of them!). And you know what? It’s dishes like this zucchini and corn sauté that will keep me coming back for more.

(A quick note about the recipe: while I prefer making this in a cast iron skillet in the oven, you could totally cook this on the stovetop. I just like the way the veggies caramelize and cook evenly in the oven. But, it’s really hot outside and you might not want to turn on your oven. In which case, I think it’s totally fine to cook this recipe on the stovetop!)

zucchini and corn skillet sauté with parmesan and basil | rosemarried.com

Zucchini and Corn Skillet Sauté with Parmesan and Basil

Serving Size: 4-6 (as a side), 2 as a main course

Ingredients

  • 1 medium zucchini, cut into small cubes
  • 1.5 cups fresh corn kernels
  • 1 shallot, minced
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 1 tablespoon butter
  • 1 cup cherry tomatoes
  • Handful of fresh basil leaves
  • Freshly grated parmesan cheese
  • Salt & freshly ground pepper, to taste
  • 1 tablespoon sherry vinegar

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Place a cast iron skillet in the oven to preheat. Once skillet is hot, add in butter, shallots, and garlic and give a good stir. Place back in the oven for 3-5 minutes.
  2. Remove skillet form oven and toss in corn and zucchini. Stir to coat, and add a bit more butter if needed. Add a dash of salt and pepper. Place skillet back in the oven and cook for 5-10 minutes, stirring once or twice.
  3. Once zucchini and corn are just starting to brown, remove from the oven. Stir in cherry tomatoes and sherry vinegar. Top with thinly sliced ribbons of fresh basil and a healthy sprinkling of finely grated parmesan cheese. Taste, and add more salt and pepper if needed.
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Spring Strawberry Salad with Lime Poppy-Seed Vinaigrette

This is such a simple and pretty spring salad. I won’t pretend this salad is anything new or revolutionary – let’s be honest, we’ve all seen spinach and strawberry salads before – but I think the simplicity of this salad is what I love most about it. It’s chock-full of gorgeous spring produce – strawberries, spinach, fennel, radishes, and snap peas – and the veggies are perfectly complemented by a bright and balanced homemade lime and poppy-seed vinaigrette.

This is one of those recipes that can easily be changed and adapted, depending on what you have on hand (or what you’re in the mood for). You could substitute lettuce, kale, arugula, or any other type of leafy green for spinach in this salad and it would be equally delicious. Or, try using pecans or hazelnuts instead of almonds. Whatever the case, you can’t go wrong with the combination of ripe strawberries, spring veggies, goat cheese, and a sweet and tangy vinaigrette.

spring strawberry salad | rosemarried

Spring Strawberry Salad with Poppyseed Vinaigrette

Ingredients

  • Several handfuls of fresh spinach leaves
  • 1 cup fresh strawberries
  • 3/4 cup sugar snap peas
  • 1/2 fennel bulb
  • 3-4 french breakfast radishes
  • 1/2 cup chopped toasted almonds
  • Crumbled goat cheese
  • 1/4 cup coconut oil (melted)
  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • 3 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
  • 1.5 tablespoons honey
  • Squeeze of fresh lime juice
  • 2 teaspoons poppy seeds
  • Pinch of yellow mustard powder
  • Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste

Instructions

  1. Wash and pat dry the fruits and vegetables. Remove strawberry tops and slice into halves or quarters. Slice the snap peas thinly, at an angle. Using a mandoline, shave the fennel bulb and radishes into thin slices.
  2. In a small bowl, whisk together the dressing ingredients – oils, vinegar, lime juice, poppy seeds, and spices.
  3. Gently toss the spinach with the strawberries, snap peas, fennel, and radishes. Toss with poppyseed vinaigrette, to coat. Sprinkle chopped almonds and goat cheese crumbles atop the salad. Sprinkle a few fennel fronds on the salad, if desired. Add an extra dash of black pepper, for an extra kick.
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Roast Vegetable ‘Stacked’ Enchiladas

This recipe isn’t anything new or life-changing. It’s isn’t particularly pretty or Pinterest-y. It’s a casserole, for crying out loud. (You could even venture to say this is something akin to a ‘Mexican lasagne’.)

But you know what? All of that aside, these vegetable enchiladas are really stinkin’ delicious. This dish has been a staple in my household for years, but I’ve hesitated writing about it here, because of the aforementioned reasons. But, you know what? To heck with reason. And to heck with pretty and Pinterest-y recipes. Because, sometimes, the best things in life aren’t pretty in the least.

And I’m totally ok with that. So, here it is then: my favorite recipe for ugly-yet-tasty roast vegetable enchiladas. I think you’ll like them. A lot.

roast vegetable enchiladas | rosemarried.com

Roast Vegetable Stacked Enchiladas

Serving Size: Serves 4-6

Ingredients

  • 15-20 corn tortillas
  • 1 can (28 oz) red enchilada sauce (my personal favorite is El Pato brand enchilada sauce)
  • 4 cups shredded cheddar cheese
  • 1 poblano pepper
  • 1 red bell pepper
  • 1 white or yellow onion, diced
  • 2 carrots
  • 1 parsnip
  • 1 cup frozen corn, thawed
  • 1 large handful kale leaves, roughly chopped
  • 2 canned chipotle peppers (in adobo), finely chopped
  • 2 teaspoons cumin
  • 1.5 tablespoons olive oil
  • Salt & pepper

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees F. Line a baking sheet with foil or a SilPat.
  2. While the oven is preheating, chop and prep the vegetables. Peel the carrots and parsnip, and chop into 1/4 pieces. Remove the stem and seeds from the poblano and bell pepper, and chop into 1/4 inch pieces. In a bowl, toss together the chopped peppers, onion, carrots, and parsnips. Stir in the olive oil, cumin, chopped chipotles, salt, and pepper. Spread the veggie mixture in an even layer on prepared baking sheet. Roast veggies in the oven until tender and starting to brown, 15-20 minutes.
  3. While veggies are roasting, heat a small amount of olive oil in a skillet over medium heat. Cook corn and chopped kale, until the kale is wilted and any excess moisture from the corn has evaporated. Season with salt and pepper. Set aside.
  4. Once the veggies are roasted, it is time to assemble the enchiladas. In a 9×13 baking dish, pour enough enchilada sauce in the bottom of the dish to coat. Place a layer of corn tortillas atop the sauce. Pour a bit more sauce over the tortilla later, using a spoon or spatula to spread evenly over the tortillas. Sprinkle a handful of cheese over the tortillas. Next, sprinkle a mix of roast vegetables (including the kale and corn) over the cheese and tortilla layer. Add a bit more cheese atop the vegetable layer. Continue to layer in this fashion – tortillas, sauce, cheese, vegetables – until the pan is full. Place a layer of tortillas atop everything, and spread sauce generously over the tortillas. Sprinkle one last layer of cheese atop of the pan, for good measure. :)
  5. Reduce oven heat to 350 degrees F. Bake enchiladas, uncovered, for 20-30 minutes. Allow to cool for 5-10 minutes before attempting to eat. (I have burnt my tongue many a time on these enchiladas!)
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Moroccan Spiced Carrots with Feta and Mint

You know what? Life is good. Life is really good.

As much as I’d like to complain, I really can’t. My cup runneth over. My freelance career is going splendidly. My husband is the best. I have an incredible network of family and friends to lean on. I have the cutest pets on the planet. Oh, and I live in a city full of talented people (and delicious food).

In addition, I recently started a job as the Marketing Director for the Beaverton Farmer’s Market. The job is a part-time and super flexible, which is a perfect compliment to my freelance schedule. It is a huge and thriving market, brimming with artisans, farmers, bakers, and makers of every sort. I love it!

Even though I’ve only been with the market for a couple of months, I can already feel a difference in my cooking and eating habits. Each week, I come home with an incredible array of baked goods, fruits, veggies, snacks, sauces, and more. I can’t help but be inspired by the things I find at the market.

During my first week at the market, I stopped by the DeNoble Farms booth and purchased a couple of rainbow carrots. I’ve eaten a lot local and organic carrots in my day, but there was something particularly special about these carrots. They are vibrant, flavorful, crisp, and sweet. They are light years beyond any carrot you’ll find in a grocery store.

For the most part, I’ve been eating these carrots raw and unadorned, which is totally delicious. However, you really can’t go wrong with these carrots. A few nights ago a made a big roast chicken dinner, and decided to make a side of spicy roasted carrots. I made up this recipe on the spot, and I feel that it’s a winner. The sweetness of the carrots pairs so nicely with the spice and smokiness of the harissa, paprika, and cumin. The addition of salty feta and fragrant mint just add to the depth and flavor of the dish.

All of that to say, I love these carrots and I love this dish. Really, I love my life. I got no complaints and I’m gonna leave it at that.

Moroccan Spiced Carrots with Feat + Mint | Rosemarried

Moroccan Spiced Carrots with Feta and Mint

Ingredients

  • 2 small bunches organic carrots (15-20 small carrots)
  • 1/3 cup crumbled feta cheese
  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh mint
  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon harissa
  • 1/2 teaspoon smoked paprika
  • 2 teaspoons ground cumin
  • 2 teaspoons lemon juice
  • 1 teaspoon honey
  • salt & pepper, to taste

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.
  2. Wash and dry carrots. Remove carrot tops, if any, and reserve for another use. If you carrots are small and thin, you may leave them whole. If they are larger, slice lengthwise in half (or quarters).
  3. In a small bowl, whisk together olive oil, harissa, spices, lemon juice, and honey. Toss the carrots with the oil and spice mixture and half of the chopped mint, then arrange in an even layer on a lined baking sheet.
  4. Roast for 20+ minutes, or until fork tender. (Roasting time will vary, depending on the size of the carrots). When tender, remove from oven and arrange in a serving dish. Sprinkle feta cheese and remaining mint atop the roasted carrots. Serve warm.
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Butternut Squash Macaroni & Cheese with Sage

I’ve been in a bit of a food rut as of late. I find myself drawn to old favorites, to dishes that are tried and true. We’ve had record rainfall in Portland this past week and as a result, I find myself feeling particularly lazy in the kitchen. I don’t want to push the culinary envelope. I just want to make something that is simple, warm, and cozy.

This is one of those recipes. Macaroni and cheese is the epitome comfort food. I’ve been making variations on this mac and cheese for years, and it never ever disappoints. It’s rich and creamy, with just a hint of sweetness from the butternut squash. The squash also adds color and texture to the cheese sauce and causes everything to meld together perfectly. (If you’ve not tried butternut squash in macaroni and cheese before, I dare you to try it. It’s remarkably good.)

All that to say, this is my go-to rainy day recipe. If you find yourself looking for a rainy day recipe in the coming weeks (I’m lookin’ at you, Portland!), I highly recommend this one. It’s real good eats.

Butternut Squash Macaroni & Cheese with Sage

Ingredients

  • 1 small butternut squash
  • 3/4 lb macaroni noodles (or other pasta)
  • 4 tablespoons butter
  • 4 tablespoons flour
  • 2 small shallots, diced
  • 2.5 cups whole milk
  • 3 cups shredded cheese (I used a mix of sharp cheddar, gruyere, mozzarella, and parmesan).
  • ½ teaspoon nutmeg
  • 1 tablespoon minced fresh sage
  • salt & pepper, to taste
  • Panko bread crumbs (for topping)

Instructions

  1. First, make the butternut squash puree (can be done ahead of time). I find that the easiest way to do this is to slice the squash in half lengthwise. Leave the skin on and remove the seeds. Rub the squash flesh with olive oil, salt, and pepper and place the squash halves (skin facing up) on a lined baking sheet. Roast in a 400 degree oven until squash is cooked all the way through and fork tender (30+ minutes). When tender, remove the squash from the oven. Allow to cool and scoop out the roasted squash flesh and place in a food processor. Pureé until smooth. (Hint: adding a bit of water or olive oil to the squash results in a smoother pureé.) If not using immediately, store in the fridge in an airtight container for up to one week.
  2. To make the mac and cheese, first preheat the oven to 375 degrees.
  3. Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Cook the pasta in the boiling water until al dente. Drain and set aside.
  4. Meanwhile, melt the butter in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add the shallots and cook for 2-3 minutes. Sprinkle the flour over the butter and shallots and whisk rapidly to combine. Continue to whisk and cook, until the flour and butter start to turn golden brown (2-3 minutes). Add in 1/2 up milk, whisking constantly. (Note: the roux will actually get thicker with the initial addition of milk. Just keep whisking and slowly adding milk and it’ll get smooth and creamy!). Pour the rest of the milk slowly, in half cup increments, whisking constantly. Once all the milk had been added, allow the sauce to simmer and thicken over low heat for 10 minutes. (Stir often and be careful not to burn it!) After 10 minutes, add the grated cheese into the sauce, stirring to combine. Stir in the squash puree, sage, nutmeg, and salt and pepper.
  5. Once the cheese is completely melted and incorporated into the sauce, toss the sauce with the cooked pasta and pour into a greased baking dish (9×13). Top with an extra handful of shredded cheese and Panko crumbs.
  6. Cover the pan with foil and bake for 20 minutes. Remove the foil and bake for another 5-10 minutes, or until bread crumbs are golden brown.

Notes

Adapted from Foodess

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Roasted Delicata Squash Rings with Mast-o-Khiar Yogurt Dip

My husband and I are part of a small and informal supper club/dinner group. We jokingly refer to these gatherings as “The Beet Goes On”, mostly due to the fact that beets always manage to appear on the menu. (Apparently, we’re all big beet fans.)

Truth be told, it doesn’t seem right to call this group a supper club. Really, it’s just five friends who like to cook food and drink wine. It’s as simple as that. We all take turns hosting, cooking, and menu-planning and we always have a great time. We feast, we talk, and we indulge in a few nice bottles of wine. It’s damn near perfect.

A few weeks ago, The Beet Goes On crew gathered at my house. I knew I wanted to make something special for the group, and I had been pouring over recipes, blogs, and cookbooks for weeks. Eventually, I settled on a Middle-Eastern (Israeli/Persian/Moroccan/etc) theme for the dinner. We dined on Shakshuka, Harissa roasted carrots & beets, feta and olives, lemony cous cous salad, flat bread, and delicata squash rings with mast-o-khiar yogurt dip. Let me tell you, it was a feast fit for kings. (Lest you think I’m giving myself all of the credit, my dinner guests made some of the sides. This was a group effort!). However, of all of the dishes we ate that night, the squash and yogurt combo was my favorite. The squash was sweet and spicy, and the yogurt dip was tangy, creamy, and refreshing. They just worked so well together.

Mast-o-Khiar is a Persian dip, which is relatively similar to a traditional Tzatziki. It is traditionally made with yogurt, cucumber, and mint. I got the idea from 101 Cookbooks, who garnishes her mast-o-khiar with rose petals, dried cranberries, and toasted almonds. I took mine in a slightly different direction, and used toasted almonds, pomegranate seeds, and a touch of flat leaf parsley. I thought it worked rather well.

Mast-o-Khiar Yogurt Dip | Rosemarried

ROASTED DELICATA SQUASH WITH MAST-O-KHIAR YOGURT DIP
Inspired by and adapted from 101 Cookbooks

For the roasted squash:
1-2 small delicata squash
1 tablespoon olive oil
Salt & pepper
1.5 teaspoons cumin
1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper
1/2 teaspoon nutmeg

For the dip:
2 cups Greek yogurt
2 cloves of garlic
3 tablespoons chopped fresh dill
2 tablespoons chopped fresh mint
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
1 small cucumber, peeled, seeded, and finely diced
High quality extra-virgin olive oil
1/3 cup toasted almonds
1/3 cup pomegranate seeds
A few sprigs of flat-leaf parsley

To make the dip:

Peel the garlic cloves and place on a cutting board. Sprinkle the garlic cloves with salt, then mash or chop into a paste. Combine the garlic paste with the yogurt, dill, and mint. Refrigerate until you’re ready to serve. When ready to serve, stir in the diced cucumber and season with salt & pepper, to taste. Spoon into a serving dish and drizzle with olive oil and garnish with toasted almonds, pomegranate seeds, and chopped parsley.

To roast the squash:

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F. Wash the squash and leave the skin on. Note: You could slice the squash into rings and de-seed each individual ring, but I prefer to de-seed the squash in one fell swoop. Here’s how you do it: Slice a 1/4″ or 1/2″ round off the top and bottom of the squash (discard these pieces). This should expose the soft center, and allow you to remove the seeds. Take a butter knife and insert it into the center of one of the exposed ends of the squash. Move the knife in a circular motion, and carve through the center of the squash from top to bottom, loosening seeds as you go. Make sure the knife penetrates through to the other end of the squash, and the seeds should fall right out. Once the squash is de-seeded, slice the squash into 1/4″ rings. Toss these rings with olive oil, salt, pepper, and spices. Lay squash rings in rows on a line baking sheet and bake for 12-15 minutes, or until fork tender and golden brown. Allow to cool slightly before eating.

On Mushroom Foraging + A Recipe for Cream of Chanterelle Soup

For most of my life, I despised mushrooms. I hated the taste and color of mushrooms, but most of all I hated their slimy texture. I viewed mushrooms as an obstacle between me and a delicious slice of pepperoni pizza.

Granted, I had good reasons for hating mushrooms. When I was a kid, I ate a small handful of mushrooms I found growing in the backyard. My mom freaked out, naturally, and had me take some sort of medication that forced me to puke up all the potentially poisonous mushrooms. It was not my finest hour. In fact, I remember the whole experience was absolutely miserable.

That day, I decided I hated mushrooms and I never looked back.

Fast forward 20+ years and I am now living in Oregon. I am married to a mushroom-loving Oregonian. Mushrooms grow like weeds in Oregon, so I am literally surrounded. Eventually, I gave in. I can actually remember the first bite of a mushroom I tried that I actually liked. It was a morel that had been sauteed in a bit of butter — and it was nothing like those sad, grey mushrooms slivers I habitually pick off my pizza. It was meaty and dense, full of flavor and texture. It was delicious.

And now, I find myself wandering in the woods in search of wild mushrooms. I’m that person. (To be fair, I still don’t get mushrooms on my pizza. Old habits die hard, I suppose.) I have been converted to the wonderful world of mushrooms, and there is no looking back.

Chanterelle Hunting | Rosemarried

Here’s the thing, I am very new to the world of mushroom hunting. I am no expert, by any stretch of the imagination. But, I think that foraging for mushrooms is a blast and I thought I’d share a few tips and tricks with you all.

The first rule when hunting for mushrooms, is know thy mushroom. Do your homework! Buy an identification guide. Before you go picking (and eating!) wild mushrooms, you should know what you’re looking for. Secondly, be safe! Do not hunt for mushrooms on private property and be sure to wear bright colors when wandering about in the woods. Lastly, pack lightly. When I forage for mushrooms I bring a knife (to cut/harvest the mushrooms), a sack for carrying the haul (burlap or something porous, so the mushrooms will spread their spores), a bottle of water, and my iPhone (for Instagramming, of course). That’s really all you need!

Since we are in the midst of chanterelle season, here a few notes about hunting for these particular mushrooms. (Thankfully, chanterelles are one of the easier mushrooms to identify and there aren’t many ‘false’ chanterelles.) Chanterelles do not have typical gills like other mushrooms, rather, they have shallow ridges. Chanterelles are not hollow and they are usually orange in color and grow out of the moss and dirt. (Note: there is a variety of mushroom that looks something like a chanterelle and it grows on wood. Chanterelles only grow out of the ground and do not grow on wood, which is a helpful identifying tip).

Chanterelle | Rosemarried

As I said, I’m no expert. I’m very new at this, but I’m having a blast! Oregon is teeming with an amazing array of mushrooms, and I’ve only begun to scratch the surface. I can’t wait for more mushroom hunting adventures! As for now, I have chanterelles coming out my ears. :) My last few foraging trips have been quite successful and I’ve cooked a lot of chanterelles in the past few weeks. Of all of the recipes I’ve tried, this one is my favorite, so I thought I’d share. Keep in mind that this recipe does not have to be made with foraged chanterelles — you can also purchase them in stores!

Cream of Chanterelle Soup | Rosemarried

Cream of Chanterelle Soup

Serving Size: 4

Ingredients

  • 1 pound chanterelle mushrooms, cleaned and roughly chopped
  • 4 large shallots, diced
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 4 sprigs fresh thyme
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 2 cups chicken (or vegetable) stock
  • 1 cup heavy cream
  • Salt, pepper, nutmeg and cayenne

Instructions

  1. In a large pot, melt butter over medium heat. Cook shallots and garlic in butter for 5 minutes, or until translucent.
  2. Add chanterelles and continue to cook for 5-10 more minutes, or until all the liquid has evaporated.
  3. Pour in the chicken stock, bay leaf, thyme, and season with salt, pepper, nutmeg, and cayenne. (Be sure there is enough liquid to full cover the mushrooms.) Bring to a boil and then lower to a simmer. Cook for 30 minutes.
  4. Remove bay leaf and thyme stems. Using an immersion blender (or food processor), puree the soup. Stir in the cream and return the pot to the stove and cook for 10 minutes. Taste, and adjust seasonings as needed.
  5. Optional garnish: cook a few cook a few extra chanterelles with butter, salt, and pepper for 5-10 minutes over medium heat. Sprinkle the mushrooms atop the soup for added texture and color.

Notes

Adapted from Saveur

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