Posts Tagged food blog

Slow Cooker Pumpkin Curry

The last few years, I’ve had relatively rotten luck with my garden. First, there are the evil crows in my neighborhood that take great delight in eating all my seeds and sprouts. (And these crows are smart! So smart, in fact, that I’m a little paranoid that they might read this blog post and punish me for it.) In addition, all the neighborhood cats think my raised beds are giant litter boxes. And, to be quite honest, I just don’t have the gift of a green thumb. I can grow herbs, greens, zucchini, and tomatoes. That’s about it.

Last year, I planted an heirloom pumpkin in my backyard. It was a gorgeous blue pumpkin, and it grew phenomenally well. It was the first time I’d planted pumpkin, and I was shocked. However, one day I came home to find that my beautiful blue pumpkin had met an untimely death. Our landlords had hired someone to trim the hedges in our backyard, and the trimmers somehow managed to stomp my poor pumpkin to death. There was no salvaging the plant or the fruit, the pumpkin was gone. I was crushed.

After the great pumpkin debacle of 2013, I wasn’t even sure I wanted to attempt growing pumpkins again. But, I decided to give it one more shot. I planted one little sugar pie pumpkin plant in my front garden (nowhere near the hedges!). Despite my best attempts to kill my garden (read: it was a very hot summer and I was very pregnant), I did manage to grow a few things this year, including one adorable little pumpkin.

I thought long and hard about what I wanted to do with my one adorable little pumpkin. I probably should have made a pie with it – after all, it is a sugar pie pumpkin – but, pies just aren’t my strong suit. And I wanted to make something out-of-the-ordinary. Something unexpected.  So, I made curry with my one little garden pumpkin. And you know what? Pumpkin curry was a great decision. It was everything I hoped it would be —  sweet, savory, and spicy. It was rich and comforting, and the perfect meal for a chilly fall evening. (And we ended up with plenty of leftovers that I froze for post-baby meals! Win!).

The moral of the story is: when life hands you a pumpkin, make curry. The end.

 

Slow Cooker Pumpkin Curry | Rosemarried.com

Slow Cooker Pumpkin Curry

Adapted from Table for Two Blog

Ingredients

  • 1 can (15 oz) of coconut milk
  • 2 cups pumpkin puree**
  • 1 cup chicken or vegetable stock
  • 2 teaspoons yellow curry powder
  • 1 teaspoon turmeric
  • 2 teaspoons garam masala
  • 1 teaspoon sambal oelek (red chili garlic paste, or sub Sriracha hot sauce)
  • 1 teaspoon fish sauce
  • Salt & pepper, to taste
  • 1 yellow onion, peeled and diced
  • 1 garlic clove, minced
  • 2 carrots, roughly chopped
  • 2 sweet potatoes, peeled and cubed
  • 2 red potatoes, washed and cubed
  • 3 chicken thighs
  • 1 cup frozen peas
  • Optional garnishes: Cilantro, plain yogurt, Sriracha

Instructions

  1. In the bowl of your slow cooker, mix together the coconut milk, stock, sambal, fish sauce, and spices. Once combined, add in the garlic, onions, carrots, potatoes, sweet potatoes, and whole chicken thighs.
  2. Cook on low for 6 hours, or the vegetables and chicken are cooked all the way through and the curry is thick and rich. (The chicken should be tender and fall apart on its own, or you can help it along and shred with a fork.) Add in the peas 15-20 minutes before serving, stirring to combine. Allow the peas to heat all the way through before serving.
  3. Serve curry with basmati rice, and garnish with Sriracha, cilantro, and plain yogurt if desired.
  4. Note: After 6 hours in the slow cooker, the curry liquid was still a little thin for my liking, so I transferred it to a Dutch oven and finished it on the stovetop. I cooked it over medium-high for 15-20 minutes and let it reduce until it was quick thick. It turned out perfectly!

Notes

**To make your own pumpkin puree, simply cut a small pumpkin in half. Remove stem and scoop out the seeds (leave the skin on). Brush pumpkin flesh with olive oil. Roast (flesh side down) on a lined baking sheet in a 400(F) oven for 35-45 minutes, or until pumpkin is soft and roasted all the way through. Scoop the roast pumpkin out of the skin and puree in a food processor or blender until smooth.

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Sweet Cream Biscuits with Roasted Plums and Chai Infused Whipped Cream

When it comes to making biscuits, there are two ways to go about it. There’s the classic Buttermilk Biscuit, and there’s the Sweet Cream Biscuit. Buttermilk biscuits are typically made with buttermilk, and lots (and lots) of butter. Sweet cream biscuits, on the other hand, opt for heavy cream instead of buttermilk and butter. Buttermilk biscuits tend to be a bit lighter and flakier, while sweet cream biscuits are slightly more scone-like. The real selling point of sweet cream biscuits is that they come together in minutes, and are incredibly easy to make. Each biscuit has their merits, and people tend to have very strong opinions when it comes to their preferred type of biscuit.

As for me, I’ve always favored the buttermilk biscuit. They’re buttery, pillowy, flaky, and perfect. To be fair, however, I’d never really given the sweet cream biscuit a chance. I’ve always defaulted to making biscuits with butter, and I’d never even attempted to make sweet cream biscuits.

Until now, that is. 

sweet cream biscuits with roasted plums and chai whipped cream | rosemarried.com

A few weeks ago, I bought a whole bunch of Italian Prune Plums at the farmer’s market. (If you’ve not tried Italian Prune Plums, they are so incredibly delicious. And they are currently in season! Go get em!) Anyway, I got home with my giant bag of plums and realized I didn’t exactly know what to do with all my plums. So, I starting perusing the interwebs for ideas, and I stumbled upon my friend Michelle’s recipe for Sweet Cream Biscuits with Earl Grey Whipped Cream and Plum Jam. I was intrigued and delighted by the recipe, and knew I needed to make my own version.

So, I started by baking a batch of sweet cream biscuits. (I had to know what all the fuss was about, after all. Turns out, they’re totally awesome.) Since I was working with fresh plums (as opposed to plum jam), I had the idea to roast the plums with a bit of brown sugar and olive oil. Lastly, I didn’t have any Earl Grey tea, but I did have a tin of loose leaf Masala Chai Tea. Bingo. And that’s how this dessert was born.

Please note, this dessert is best eaten fresh! Biscuits are a type of quick bread, and they generally don’t keep well. Biscuits really are best the day they are baked, but they’re ok the next day if warmed or toasted.  In general, however, I recommend you make this recipe the day you plan on eating it. (The plums and whipped cream, however, keep nicely in the fridge and are delicious for breakfast the next day…)

sweet cream biscuits with roasted plums and chai whipped cream | rosemarried.com

Sweet Cream Biscuits with Roasted Plums and Chai Infused Whipped Cream

Serving Size: Makes 8-10 biscuits

Ingredients

  • For the Sweet Cream Biscuits:
  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 tablespoon baking powder
  • 3 teaspoons granulated sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1 1/4 cups plus 1 tablespoon heavy cream, chilled

  • For the Chai Spiced Whipped Cream:
  • 1 cup heavy whipping cream
  • 2 tablespoons loose-leaf Chai tea
  • 2 teaspoons powdered sugar

  • For the Roasted Plums:
  • Several ripe Italian prune plums (8-10)
  • 1-2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon light brown sugar

Instructions

  1. To make the Chai whipped cream: In a small bowl or jar, combine 1 cup of whipping cream with the loose leaf Chai tea. Gently stir together and cover the container, and allow to steep in the fridge for 1 hour or more.
  2. After the whipped cream has steeped for an hour, strain out the tea leaves (using a mesh sieve or cheesecloth). Pour the cream into a medium sized bowl (or the bowl of your stand mixer) and add the powdered sugar. Using an electric mixer (or stand mixer), beat the cream on medium-high speed until soft peaks form.
  3. To roast the plums: Preheat oven to 400 F. Wash and halve the plums, removing the pits. Toss plum halves with olive oil and brown sugar. Bake for 10-15 minutes, until plums are browning and releasing their juices. Remove from oven and set aside until use.
  4. To make the Sweet Cream Biscuits: Preheat the oven to 425F. Line a baking sheet with parchment or a Silpat.
  5. In a large bowl, whisk together the flour, baking powder, sugar, and salt until well combined. Pour one cup of the cream over the dry ingredients, using a fork (or your hands) to gently mix the ingredients together. If the mixture is too dry, add more cream, one spoonful at a time, until the dough is soft and moist. Using your hands, gently knead the dough until it just comes together. (Be careful not to overknead!)
  6. Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured surface. Lightly pat the dough into a disc with your hands, until it is 1/2″ thick. (Once again, be sure not overwork the dough!)
  7. Using a biscuit cutter (or juice glass!), cut out the biscuit circles. Be sure to cut the biscuits close together, and get as many as you can from this round. Transfer the biscuits to the prepared baking sheet. Gather the remaining scraps together and gently pat into another 1/2″ disc and cut out another batch of biscuits. (Note: only repeat this process once. Toss any remaining scraps, as dough will be too overworked at this point.)
  8. Once you’ve cut out all your biscuits and placed them on baking sheets, brush the tops of the biscuits with cream. (Optional: you can also sprinkle a bit of sugar atop each biscuit, which I think looks rather pretty.) Bake at 425 for 15-18 minutes, or until the biscuits are fluffy and golden brown. Transfer to a wire rack and allow to cool slightly before serving.

Notes

Adapted from Hummingbird High

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Peach Cornmeal Skillet Cake with Lavender

I’ve made this recipe a couple of times now, and finally took the time to stop and snap a couple of photos. That’s the problem with delicious desserts, you see. They disappear far too quickly to take photos.

Truth be told, however, this isn’t the most photogenic of cakes. Granted, this recipe is an adaptation of a Martha Stewart recipe. Of course, her version looks absolutely stunning. The peach slices are arranged with care, each one placed perfectly in line. The cake is baked in a skillet, but then is turned out onto a gorgeous serving board. It’s a Martha masterpiece.

peach and cornmeal skillet cake | rosemarried.com

My version isn’t nearly as pretty as Martha’s. And my baby bump accidentally made an appearance in most of the photos. Oops.

 

But, let’s be honest. Who has the time or the energy for that? I certainly don’t.

You know what I did? I sauteed the peach slices in a lot of butter (and sugar!) and left them in the bottom of the skillet. I didn’t arrange them whatsoever. I poured batter on top of the peaches and baked the cake. Then, I ate the cake straight out of the skillet. And you know what? It was damn near perfect. The cake was buttery and moist, and just bursting with juicy summer peaches. The lavender was subtle, yet present, and added a unique and surprising flavor to the cake. It was fantastic.

Sure, it might not be as pretty as Martha’s version, but that’s fine by me. I want to cook attainable food that tastes good. The reality is that most of us are busy people with jobs, kids, pets, sports, mortgages, and all sorts of other responsibilities. We simply don’t have the time to arrange peach slices in concentric circles. And that’s ok.

There’s a time and a place for pretty cakes with pretty peach slices. But there’s also a time for peach cornmeal skillet cakes that are simple, easy, and totally delicious. This is one of those times.

peach and cornmeal skillet cake with lavender | rosemarried.com

Peach Cornmeal Skillet Cake with Lavender

Serving Size: 8

Ingredients

  • 1 stick (plus 3 tablespoons) unsalted butter, room temperature
  • 1 cup light brown sugar
  • 3-4 ripe peaches (skins on), sliced into 3/4″ wedges
  • 1 cup coarse yellow cornmeal
  • 3/4 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 2 teaspoons dried lavender
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 3 large eggs
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1/2 teaspoon nutmeg
  • 1/2 cup heavy cream

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.
  2. In a 9″ or 10″ cast iron skillet, melt 3 tablespoons of butter over medium heat. When butter is bubbling and melted, add in peach slices, nutmeg, and 1/4 cup of the brown sugar, and stir to coat. Reduce heat to low, and allow peaches to cook until most of the juice has boiled off and peaches are beginning to caramelize, about 10 to 12 minutes. Remove from heat.
  3. In a small bowl, whisk together the flour, baking powder, lavender, and salt. In another bowl, beat the remaining butter with 3/4 cup of brown sugar on high speed. Beat until fluffy, about 2-3 minutes. Reduce the speed to medium, and add in the eggs, one at a time. Scrape the sides of the bowl occasionally, and add in vanilla and cream.
  4. Next, pour in the the cornmeal mixture, stirring just to combine. Pour batter over peach slices, using a spatula to spread the batter evenly.
  5. Bake for 20-22 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted into the center of the cake comes out clean. Remove skillet from the oven, and allow cake to cool at least slightly before serving. (I highly recommend serving this cake with a heaping dollop of homemade whipped cream. It’s downright dreamy.)

Notes

Adapted from Martha Stewart

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End of Summer Preserves: A Roundup of Canning Favorites and a Recipe for Quick Pickled Grapes!

As much as I hate to admit it, the end of summer is rapidly approaching. For some, it may already feel like summer is over. School is back in session, the days are getting shorter, and the nights are cool and crisp.

I can’t say I’m ready for summer to be over. I want to savor it for just a little bit longer.  Thankfully, that’s the beauty of canning. I can literally bottle up the bounty of summer and store it in a jar, and enjoy the spoils of summer throughout the year.

That being said, I thought I would share some of my favorite summer canning recipes with you all. Fall is just around the corner, and now is the perfect time to put up your favorite summer fruits and vegetables. I’ve included a number of links to my own recipes, as well as a collection of recipes from friends and bloggers. Be sure to scroll all the way down, as I’ve also included a recipe for Quick Pickled Grapes from my friend Mary!  (Bonus: if you’re in the Portland area, there’s also a PDX Food Swap on September 21st. You can trade your canned goods for other amazing homemade creations!)

Spicy Tomato Jam | Rosmarried

Spicy Tomato Jam from Rosemarried

 A few of my personal favorite canning + preserving recipes: 

Blueberry Lavender Jam with Vanilla Bean

Raspberry Jalapeno Jam

Fire Roasted Tomato Sauce

Bourbon Pickled Peaches

24 Hour (Refrigerator) Dill Pickles

Spicy Tomato Jam

Slow Cooker Blueberry Plum Butter

Marionberry Jam from PDX Food Love

Marionberry Jam from PDX Food Love

 

A few delightful canning recipes from friends and other bloggers:  

Refrigerator Pickled Okra from Hip Girl’s Guide to Homemaking

Marionberry Jam from PDX Food Love

Summer’s End Stonefruits (This post contains a whole bunch of amazing recipes for preserving stone fruits from the lovely Kate Payne!)

Peach Sriracha Butter from Cake Walk

Salted Cantaloupe Jam from Back to Her Roots

Tomato Rhubarb Ketchup from Savory Simple

Vietnamese Pickled Vegetables from Use Real Butter

Honey Sweetened Apricot Thyme Jam from Marisa of Food in Jars (for Simple Bites)

 And last, but certainly not least, we have a guest recipe from Mary Crowe of MaryEats.com. This recipe is quick, easy, and totally delicious. And, it’s a great way to make your grapes last longer! Go forth and pickle some grapes today!

quick pickled grapes | rosemarried.com

Quick Pickled Grapes from MaryEats.com

Quick Pickled Grapes

Serving Size: Yields 6 half pints

A note about pickling spice: I love World Spice Merchant’s pickling blend. If you don’t have a blend, make your own with black pepper, a cinnamon stick, mace, yellow mustard seed, bay leaves, a dried small chile, allspice berries, a clove or two.

Recipe by Mary Crowe of MaryEats.com

Ingredients

  • 1 cup water
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1 cup sherry vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon pickling spice
  • 5 cups of grapes, washed and stemmed

Instructions

  1. Wash all jars and lids in hot soapy water then rinse. Place clean jars on a cooling rack set inside a baking sheet. Evenly distribute the grapes between the jars, you want to leave 1-inch of head room.
  2. In a saucepan, combine the water, sugar, vinegar and spices. Bring to a boil and remove from heat. Let brine steep for 10 minutes. Strain the liquid into a large glass measuring cup and discard the spices.
  3. Evenly distribute the liquid among the jars leaving a bit of room at the top. Cap jars and store in the fridge.
  4. Wait at least 24 hours before eating the grapes.
  5. If you aren’t making to share with friends, you can use a large container instead of individual jars. Place all the grapes in one large container and pour liquid over before storing in the fridge.
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Buckwheat Zucchini Muffins

I recently received a copy of Erin Scott’s new cookbook,  ”Yummy Supper: 100 Fresh, Luscious & Honest Recipes from a {Gluten-Free} Omnivore“. I’m not gonna lie, I was a little hesitant about the book at first glance. For starters, I love gluten. I have no known gluten allergies or intolerances (pizza is my favorite food group!), thus, I have no need for a gluten-free cookbook. Secondly, the word “yummy” just bugs me. It conjures up images of Rachael Ray and overly perky Food Network hosts, and I just don’t like it.

So, then, when I finally opened the book, I was pleasantly surprised. The book is brimming with beautiful photographs and creative recipes. And while the book is written from a gluten-free perspective, it certainly has recipes that appeal to all types of diets.

buckwheat zucchini muffins | rosemarried.com

 

While there were a lot of standouts in the book – such as Black Rice PuddingSavory Custards with Wild NettlesMussels with Rosé, Leeks, and Mustard - but I decided to start with her simple and lovely recipe for Buckwheat Zucchini Muffins.

The recipe stood out to me, as it’s such a unique twist on a typical zucchini muffin. Made with buckwheat flour, coconut oil, honey, and molasses, these muffins pack a flavorful punch. They’re a great way to use up extra zucchini, and they are officially my new favorite summer snack.

Yummy Supper’s version of the recipe uses a combination of oat flour and buckwheat flour, and is gluten free. I didn’t have any oat flour on hand, so I substituted all purpose flour. Thus, my version of this recipe contains gluten. However, the recipe is easily adaptable depending on your dietary restrictions!

buckwheat zucchini muffins | rosemarried.com

 

Buckwheat Zucchini Muffins

Serving Size: Makes 1 dozen muffins

Ingredients

  • 2/3 cup buckwheat flour
  • 1/2 cup all purpose flour (Can sub oat flour if GF)
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • 2 eggs, room temperature
  • 2/3 cup honey
  • 1/3 cup coconut oil
  • 2 heaping tablespoons molasses
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1.5 cups shredded zucchini, strained or patted dry with a towel
  • Optional: 1/2 cup chopped walnuts, almonds, or hazelnuts

Instructions

  1. First, combine the honey and coconut oil in a small pot. Heat over medium-low heat until oil and honey are melted. Stir to combine and set aside to cool.
  2. Preheat oven to 350 F. Line a muffin tin with paper muffin cups.
  3. In a small bowl, mix together the flours, salt, baking powder, baking soda, and spices.
  4. In a large bowl, whisk the eggs together with the honey and coconut oil mixture. Whisk in molasses and vanilla. With a spatula, stir in the dry ingredients until combined. Fold in the zucchini (and nuts, if using).
  5. Pour your batter into the lined muffin cups. Bake for 18-22 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean. Remove from the oven and allow to cool on a wire rack.
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Grilled Artichokes with Garlic Herb Aioli + My Favorite Labor Day Grilling Recipes!

 

I don’t post a lot of grilling recipes here. That’s mostly due to the fact that my husband is the primary griller in our home, and I have no idea how he does what he does. Therefore, I cannot share these recipes and tips with you. His grill methods are a mystery to me! (I will say, however, that he helped me develop a recipe for Grilled Flank Steak with Charred Green Onions and Hazelnut Romesco, which can be found in my new cookbook! Just sayin’.)

However, I do occasionally dabble in grilling from time to time.

There’s something about grilling that is just so satisfying. Cooking food over an open flame (or coals) in the great outdoors is a bit of a challenge, but it’s also a ton of fun. And, Labor Day weekend is the perfect time to grill up some grub and soak up the last bits of summer.

A few weeks ago, we decided to grill up a few artichokes with dinner. It was a fantastic decision. Honestly, I cannot begin to express to you how delicious they were. We gobbled up the artichokes in moments, leaving behind a big ole heap of artichoke carnage. It was awesome. I usually steam or boil artichokes, which is also delicious, but grilling brings them up a notch. The grill imparts just a bit of char and a slightly smoky flavor. It’s perfect.

So, then, I’ll share with you my recipe for Grilled Artichokes with Garlic and Herb Aioli. In addition, I’ve posted a whole list of my favorite grilling recipes, all of which would be perfect for your Labor Day BBQ.  Whatever your plans may be, I hope you enjoy the holiday weekend and that you enjoy these last lovely bits of summer.

Grilled Artichokes with Garlic Herb Aioli

Ingredients

  • 4 artichokes
  • 2 lemons, halved
  • Olive oil
  • 1/2 cup mayonaise
  • 2 cloves garlic, finely minced
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 tablespoon minced fresh herbs, such as rosemary, oregano, and thyme

Instructions

  1. First, trim the artichokes. Clip the thorns (the sharp tips of the artichoke leaves) with scissors and remove any small outer leaves near the base of the stem.
  2. Place the artichokes and a couple of lemon halves in a large pot of salted water. Bring to a boil, and cook for approximately 30 minutes. (To check and see if the artichokes are done, stick a fork in the stem of the artichoke. If it’s tender and the fork pulls out easily, they’re ready!)
  3. Drain off the water and allow artichokes to cool for a few minutes. In the meantime, prepare your grill.
  4. Once your grill is hot and the artichokes are cook enough to handle, prepare the artichokes for grilling. Using a sharp knife, cut the artichokes in half lengthwise. Then, using a spoon or paring knife, remove the choke (the fuzzy bits in the center). Brush artichokes with olive oil and place on a plate.
  5. Place artichoke halves on the center of the grill, directly over the heat. Grill for 10 minutes, or until you get grill marks.
  6. To make the aioli, mix together the mayo, pepper, garlic, and fresh herbs. Serve the grilled artichokes with the aioli and slices of fresh lemon.
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labor day grilling recipes | rosemarried

 

A few of my personal favorite grilling recipes: 

Grilled Brussels Sprouts with Whole Grain Mustard

Grilled Corn Salad with Cherry Tomatoes and Avocado

Grilled Zucchini Bruschetta

 

A few of my favorite grilling recipes from a few of my favorite blogs: 

Grilled Pizzas – 101 Cookbooks

Grilled Chipotle Pork Tenderloin with Fresh Cherry Salsa – Sweet Peas & Saffron

Grilled Watermelon with Jalapeno, Feta, and Honey – Domesticate Me

Grilled Zucchini and Corn Pasta with Parmesan – The Scrumptious Pumpkin

Grilled Halloumi with Strawberries and Herbs - The Turntable Kitchen

Grilled Kale & Fig Salad – Local Haven

Grilled Apricot and Burrata Salad – PDX Food Love

Grilled Peaches with Mascarpone Whipped Cream and Caramel Sauce – Spicy Southern Kitchen

 

Happy Labor Day weekend, y’all!

xoxo

Lindsay

 

Ingredient Spotlight: Percebes!

It’s not often that I am presented with a food or ingredient that is completely foreign to me. I consider myself to be a well-rounded and adventurous eater and I’ve tried a lot of different things in my lifetime. (I lived in Alaska, for crying out loud. We wild game of every shape and size. Have you ever eaten bear chili or moose burgers? I have.)

However, last weekend I was invited to try percebes at Lincoln. I had never even heard of percebes, let alone eaten them. I was intrigued. I’ve never known Jenn Louis to steer me wrong, and if she was excited to prepare and serve percebes, I was excited to eat them.

First off, you might be wondering what on earth I’m talking about. Percebes?!

Percebes at Lincoln PDX

 

 

Let me explain. Percebes  - also known as goose barnacles, gooseneck barnacles, or stalked barnacles – are crustaceans that grow on rocks and debris in the ocean. While gooseneck barnacles can be found in Oregon, Jenn and the Lincoln team source the best possible barnacles, which come from British Columbia. And, yes, it should go without saying that percebes are strange and bizarre looking little creatures. While they may be strange to look at, however, percebes are completely and totally delicious.

At Lincoln, percebes are prepared simply and beautifully. The barnacles are quickly poached in boiling water, and are served with lemon wedges and herb and garlic olive oil. The texture is something akin to a clam, but the flavor is more along the lines of fresh shrimp. The texture is chewy, but not overly so. They’re fresh and wonderful and they taste like the sea. They’re honestly unlike anything I’ve ever had.

All of that to say, percebes are a rare and unique ingredient, and I highly encourage you all to pop into Lincoln in the next few weeks and give them a try for yourself. (Lincoln should have percebes on the menu for the next few weekends, depending on availability. You can always call ahead and inquire!)

A huge thank you to Jenn Louis and the Lincoln team for introducing me to a tasty new creature. While my meal was comped, all opinions expressed here are my own.