Posts Tagged recipe

Turmeric Coconut Tea + Friday Favorites

I’m tired, friends. It’s Friday, but I only know that because the internet told me so. At this point in my life, the days all blur together. I’m managing to keep a tiny human alive, which is no small feat. These tiny humans are hard work! (Fun fact: I’m currently typing this while wearing the little one in a wrap and bouncing on a yoga ball. Oh, and she’s crying because she’s overtired and is refusing to sleep. It’s one of those days.)

But when life hands you a cranky and overtired baby, you just gotta do what you can to get through it. I have to remind myself that it’s a phase, and it won’t last forever.

It’s precisely days like this that I make myself a big cup of Turmeric Coconut Tea. It’s all the good things, in one little cup. It’s warm and wonderful; comforting and healing. It lifts my spirits and soothes my tired and weary bones. Whatever your troubles may be, I promise this tea will help. It may not fix all your troubles, but it will certainly brighten your day. It’s just that kind of elixir.

Coconut Turmeric Tea | Rosemarried

I originally discovered this tea on 101 Cookbooks, and then re-discovered it when my friend Kirsten posted about her coconut milk variation of the tea.

There are a number of ways you can make this tea. I start with a mug, and add to it a heaping spoonful of ground turmeric and a heaping spoonful of raw honey. I then add a dash of hot water to the honey and turmeric, and stir together until a paste forms. I then fill the mug with equal parts hot water and hot coconut milk (which I boil together on the stovetop), and stir until the paste dissolves. I then add a generous squeeze of fresh lemon juice, a couple grinds of black pepper, a dash of cayenne, and a cinnamon stick. That’s how I like my turmeric tea, but feel free to make it to your liking. I imagine that it would be wonderful with a bit of freshly grated ginger, and I’ve often wondered how it would taste with a glug of whiskey. (A turmeric toddy, perhaps?)

That, my friends, is how you make a delightful cup of turmeric coconut tea. And, since it’s Friday, I thought I’d leave you with a list of a few of my favorite things. Just because.

FRIDAY FAVORITES: JANUARY 9, 2015

I made this pasta recipe this week, with kale and sage pesto, brussels sprouts, and a brown butter bread crumb topping. It requires a lot of ingredients and has quite a few moving parts, but it’s worth it. I will make this recipe again and again.

This article about the first 3 months of motherhood. This kind of honesty is comforting and refreshing. It’s not all rainbows and roses, people.

Grantland. If I could write for any website, I honestly think it would be Grantland. That may sound strange coming from a food blogger, but I have a secret dream of being an edgy feminist sports writer. I think sports (and sports fans) are an interesting reflection of culture, and I am constantly intrigued by Grantland’s take on sports culture in America. If you don’t believe me, read this brilliant article on Kobe Bryant (and why we love to hate him).

Stammtisch. This new(ish) German brewpub is our current favorite spot for a weeknight meal and/or brew. An excellent selection of German beers? Check. Family friendly? Check. A television for Blazer watching? Check. Incredibly delicious German food? Check. Great service and friendly waitstaff? Check. Stammtisch has it all.

I recently started working with Water Avenue Coffee Co. and I cannot say enough good things about these folks. First of all, the coffee is delicious.  And everyone who works there (baristas! roasters! owners! drivers!) are all so darn nice. It’s just an awesome company, all around. I’m really excited about working with them. Here’s to a coffee-filled 2015!

My slow cooker. Since having a baby, I’ve found that the slow cooker is my best friend. It’s just so darn easy. You just throw in your ingredients and walk away. Some of my favorite slow cooker recipes are for pulled pork, pumpkin curry, pot roast, and tomato soup. Oh, and I really want to try this slow cooker beef ragu recipe.

Margaritas. Oh, how I’d missed margaritas. My husband got me a bottle of Mezcal for Christmas (and he made a big batch of homemade sour mix!) and I forgot how good a margarita can be. After nearly a year without them, I’m glad to welcome margaritas back into my life. (For what it’s worth, my favorite margaritas in Portland can be found at Por Que No?, Xico, and Bunk Bar.)

And that’ll do it for today’s favorites. The baby is awake (again) and crying (again) and so I must go. Happy Friday!

 

 

Cranberry Rum Punch

Lordy, I don’t know how all you mom bloggers do it. I barely have time to shower each day, let alone cook a meal. And finding time to photograph and write about said meal? Forget about it. 

All of that to say, I’ve been having trouble finding the time to devote to the blog. And I’m strangely ok with that. It’s good to step back for a bit and take time to be with my family. I’m getting to know this tiny daughter of mine and I’m figuring out how to be a mother. It’s the hardest thing I’ve ever done, but it’s also the best thing I’ve ever done. It’s pretty damn wonderful.

The other day, however, my husband held the baby while I concocted a recipe for this celebratory cranberry rum punch. I snapped a couple of quick photos, scribbled down a recipe, and happily drank a glass of said punch while the baby slept peacefully in his arms. It was wonderful.

So, here’s to 2014 – it’s been one for the books. I can’t wait to see what 2015 holds. Cheers, and happy New Year to you and yours!

cranberry rum punch | rosemarried.com

CRANBERRY RUM PUNCH: WITH ORANGE AND BLACKSTRAP MOLASSES 

For the cranberry syrup: 

1 cup fresh cranberries

2 large strips of orange zest

1/2 cup water

1/2 cup brown sugar

1 tablespoon blackstrap molasses

 

For the punch: 

1 cup golden rum (I use Fleur de Cana)

1 cup ginger beer**

1/2 cup freshly squeezed orange juice

Cranberry syrup, to taste (up to 1/2 a cup)

A few dashes of orange bitters

Orange zest and cranberries, for garnish

**You can substitute soda water for ginger beer. The cocktail will be less sweet, but won’t have that spicy ginger kick.

 

METHOD: 

To make the cranberry syrup, place the cranberries, water, molasses, orange zest, and brown sugar in a small pot. Simmer over low heat until the cranberries have broken down and the mixture has a thick and syrupy texture. Using cheesecloth or a mesh sieve, strain out the fruit (reserve for another use). Set syrup aside to cool.

To make the punch, combine rum, ginger beer (or soda water), and orange juice. Add in cranberry syrup in small quantities. Stir and taste until the punch is to your liking. Add a few dashes of orange bitters. If serving in a punch bowl, garnish with round orange slices and fresh cranberries. If serving by the glass, serve over ice with a strip of orange zest.

 

 

 

Homemade Apple Toaster Strudels

Growing up, there were a lot of foods that weren’t allowed in our home: Sugar cereals. White bread. TV dinners. Soda. Regular peanut butter, such as Peter Pan or Jiff (we could only have the natural kind! It was hard as a rock and wasn’t sugary and creamy and delightful!). Tang. Kool-Aid. Pop Tarts. Toaster Strudels.

Of all the banned foods, I felt that the lack of Toaster Strudels was the greatest injustice. In my childhood mind, Toaster Strudels were the ultimate treat, and I was sorely disappointed that I was not allowed to indulge in these sugary and wonderful toaster pastries.

Homemade Apple Toaster Strudel | Rosemarried.com

Now that I’m an adult, I completely understand my mom’s food rules. I appreciate that she made us eat fruits and vegetables, and taught us how to make healthy choices. To this day, I don’t like white bread and I don’t drink soda (save for the occasional Mexi-Coke with tacos. Mmmm…).

But, that doesn’t mean that I don’t have my vices. I LOVE sugar. If I let myself, I would eat Salsa Verde Doritos every single day. And, I still have a weakness for Toaster Strudels. They’re warm and buttery pockets of sugary goodness, and they come with a packet of frosting so that you can slather icing all over the warm strudel. I’m sorry, it doesn’t get much better than that.

So, when I saw a recipe for homemade apple toaster strudels, I knew I had to make them. And, since they’re homemade they’re totally good for you right? That’s what I’m telling myself, anyway.

p.s. I made these toaster strudels weeks ago, before our little one was born. It’s just taken me this long to get around to editing photos and writing a post! 

p.p.s. Apparently I suck at frosting toaster strudels. The frosting tasted great, but looked pretty stupid. We all have our strengths, and apparently icing toaster strudels is not one of mine. 

Homemade Apple Toaster Strudel | Rosemarried.com

Homemade Apple Toaster Strudels with Cream Cheese Icing

Serving Size: 8

Ingredients

  • For the crust:
  • 2 sheets of puff pastry (1 box), thawed
  • 1 egg, lightly beaten

  • For the filling:
  • 3 apples, peeled and cored
  • 4 tablespoons unsalted butter, divided
  • 1/4 cup packed dark brown sugar
  • 1/4 cup light brown sugar
  • 1 tablespoon all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon freshly squeezed lemon juice
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg

  • For the cream cheese icing:
  • 4 ounces cream cheese
  • 1 cup powdered sugar
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract

Instructions

  1. To make the filling, first grate the apples using a cheese grater or food processor. In a skillet or saucepan, melt the butter over medium heat. When the butter is melted, stir in the grated apples. Add the brown sugars, flour, lemon juice, cinnamon, and nutmeg. Cook over medium heat, stirring often, until the mixture is thick and reduced (about 10-15 minutes). Remove from heat and allow to cool.
  2. Preheat the oven to 375°F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper or a Silpat.
  3. Working on a well-floured surface, roll out one sheet of puff pastry into a large, thin rectangle – about 10″x14″. (Note: puff pastry can be very sticky, so be sure to flour as necessary.) Using a sharp knife or pizza cutter, cut into 8 rectangles (3.5″x5″).
  4. Using a spatula, transfer 4 of the rectangles to a prepared baking sheet. Place 2 tablespoons of the apple filling in the center of each rectangle and spread across the pastry, leaving about a 1/2″ of space along the edge. Brush the other 4 pastry rectangles with the egg wash. Next, place an egg-washed piece of pastry atop a filled rectangle (egg-side down). Using your fingers, or a fork, firmly seal all the edges. Continue with the rest of the rectangles. Prick each with a fork or knife several times. Brush the top of each strudel with a bit of egg wash. Repeat this step with the second sheet of puff pastry.
  5. Bake the strudels until puffy and golden brown, about 35 minutes. Cool for a few minutes before frosting and eating. Best served warm!
  6. To make the cream cheese icing: beat the cream cheese, powdered sugar, and vanilla extract together until mixture is fluffy and well-combined. Frost the strudels with a knife, piping bag, or a Ziploc bag with a small hole cut in one corner.

Notes

Adapted from The Kitchn

http://rosemarried.com/2014/11/14/homemade-apple-toaster-strudels/

 

 

Fall Favorites

A little over two weeks ago, we welcomed our tiny daughter into the world.

It’s crazy how time flies. She’s only be here for 2 weeks, and she’s already changed so much. Truth be told, I’ve changed a lot in the past couple of weeks as well. I had no idea that it was possible to be so utterly exhausted and completely in love, all at the same time. Parenthood is strange like that.

With that being said, I’ve not been doing a whole lot of cooking lately. Really, haven’t needed to cook because our friends and family have been so generous and have been bringing us meals (and cleaning our house, and supplying us with tiny baby clothes and diapers…) I know I’ll get back in the kitchen eventually, but for now it’s nice to rest and relax and allow others to help us while we adjust to this crazy thing called parenthood.

I’m sure I’ll be back in the kitchen soon enough. For now, I’m happy to drool over recipes and photos on Pinterest and plot out all the amazing things I’m going to make this fall and winter. Since I’ve been keeping a list, I thought I’d share it with you. Some of these are my own recipes, and some of these are recipes I found online. They’re all warm and comforting and perfect for Fall. Enjoy!

fall favorites | rosemarried.com

 

Here’s a few fall recipes from my own archives: 

Harissa-Stewed Butternut Squash

Cream of Chanterelle Soup

Pumpkin and Kale Salad with Tahini Dressing

Pumpkin Pancakes with Cream Cheese Butter

Slow Cooker Apple Butter

Lentil and Sweet Potato Soup with Cilantro and Bacon

Spiced Cranberry and Pear Compote

Shepherd’s Pie with Potato, Parsnip, and Goat Cheese Mash

 

And here’s a few favorite fall recipes from friends across the web:

Curried Coconut Cauliflower Soup from Lunch Box Bunch

Leek, Fennel, Apple + Walnut Soup with Turmeric from The First Mess

Tomato and Coconut Curry with Delicata Squash and Kale from So Let’s Hang Out

Pumpkin Cheesecake Tart with Gingersnap Crust from Saveur

Warm Brussels Caesar with Bacon Cibatta Croutons from How Sweet it Is

Rainbow Chard and Roasted Pear Salad from Brooklyn Supper

Pumpkin Creme Fraiche Spaghetti with Fried Sage from Café Johnsonia

 

Slow Cooker Pumpkin Curry

The last few years, I’ve had relatively rotten luck with my garden. First, there are the evil crows in my neighborhood that take great delight in eating all my seeds and sprouts. (And these crows are smart! So smart, in fact, that I’m a little paranoid that they might read this blog post and punish me for it.) In addition, all the neighborhood cats think my raised beds are giant litter boxes. And, to be quite honest, I just don’t have the gift of a green thumb. I can grow herbs, greens, zucchini, and tomatoes. That’s about it.

Last year, I planted an heirloom pumpkin in my backyard. It was a gorgeous blue pumpkin, and it grew phenomenally well. It was the first time I’d planted pumpkin, and I was shocked. However, one day I came home to find that my beautiful blue pumpkin had met an untimely death. Our landlords had hired someone to trim the hedges in our backyard, and the trimmers somehow managed to stomp my poor pumpkin to death. There was no salvaging the plant or the fruit, the pumpkin was gone. I was crushed.

After the great pumpkin debacle of 2013, I wasn’t even sure I wanted to attempt growing pumpkins again. But, I decided to give it one more shot. I planted one little sugar pie pumpkin plant in my front garden (nowhere near the hedges!). Despite my best attempts to kill my garden (read: it was a very hot summer and I was very pregnant), I did manage to grow a few things this year, including one adorable little pumpkin.

I thought long and hard about what I wanted to do with my one adorable little pumpkin. I probably should have made a pie with it – after all, it is a sugar pie pumpkin – but, pies just aren’t my strong suit. And I wanted to make something out-of-the-ordinary. Something unexpected.  So, I made curry with my one little garden pumpkin. And you know what? Pumpkin curry was a great decision. It was everything I hoped it would be —  sweet, savory, and spicy. It was rich and comforting, and the perfect meal for a chilly fall evening. (And we ended up with plenty of leftovers that I froze for post-baby meals! Win!).

The moral of the story is: when life hands you a pumpkin, make curry. The end.

 

Slow Cooker Pumpkin Curry | Rosemarried.com

Slow Cooker Pumpkin Curry

Adapted from Table for Two Blog

Ingredients

  • 1 can (15 oz) of coconut milk
  • 2 cups pumpkin puree**
  • 1 cup chicken or vegetable stock
  • 2 teaspoons yellow curry powder
  • 1 teaspoon turmeric
  • 2 teaspoons garam masala
  • 1 teaspoon sambal oelek (red chili garlic paste, or sub Sriracha hot sauce)
  • 1 teaspoon fish sauce
  • Salt & pepper, to taste
  • 1 yellow onion, peeled and diced
  • 1 garlic clove, minced
  • 2 carrots, roughly chopped
  • 2 sweet potatoes, peeled and cubed
  • 2 red potatoes, washed and cubed
  • 3 chicken thighs
  • 1 cup frozen peas
  • Optional garnishes: Cilantro, plain yogurt, Sriracha

Instructions

  1. In the bowl of your slow cooker, mix together the coconut milk, stock, sambal, fish sauce, pumpkin puree and spices. Once combined, add in the garlic, onions, carrots, potatoes, sweet potatoes, and whole chicken thighs.
  2. Cook on low for 6 hours, or the vegetables and chicken are cooked all the way through and the curry is thick and rich. (The chicken should be tender and fall apart on its own, or you can help it along and shred with a fork.) Add in the peas 15-20 minutes before serving, stirring to combine. Allow the peas to heat all the way through before serving.
  3. Serve curry with basmati rice, and garnish with Sriracha, cilantro, and plain yogurt if desired.
  4. Note: After 6 hours in the slow cooker, the curry liquid was still a little thin for my liking, so I transferred it to a Dutch oven and finished it on the stovetop. I cooked it over medium-high for 15-20 minutes and let it reduce until it was quick thick. It turned out perfectly!

Notes

**To make your own pumpkin puree, simply cut a small pumpkin in half. Remove stem and scoop out the seeds (leave the skin on). Brush pumpkin flesh with olive oil. Roast (flesh side down) on a lined baking sheet in a 400(F) oven for 35-45 minutes, or until pumpkin is soft and roasted all the way through. Scoop the roast pumpkin out of the skin and puree in a food processor or blender until smooth.

http://rosemarried.com/2014/10/12/slow-cooker-pumpkin-curry/

Sweet Cream Biscuits with Roasted Plums and Chai Infused Whipped Cream

When it comes to making biscuits, there are two ways to go about it. There’s the classic Buttermilk Biscuit, and there’s the Sweet Cream Biscuit. Buttermilk biscuits are typically made with buttermilk, and lots (and lots) of butter. Sweet cream biscuits, on the other hand, opt for heavy cream instead of buttermilk and butter. Buttermilk biscuits tend to be a bit lighter and flakier, while sweet cream biscuits are slightly more scone-like. The real selling point of sweet cream biscuits is that they come together in minutes, and are incredibly easy to make. Each biscuit has their merits, and people tend to have very strong opinions when it comes to their preferred type of biscuit.

As for me, I’ve always favored the buttermilk biscuit. They’re buttery, pillowy, flaky, and perfect. To be fair, however, I’d never really given the sweet cream biscuit a chance. I’ve always defaulted to making biscuits with butter, and I’d never even attempted to make sweet cream biscuits.

Until now, that is. 

sweet cream biscuits with roasted plums and chai whipped cream | rosemarried.com

A few weeks ago, I bought a whole bunch of Italian Prune Plums at the farmer’s market. (If you’ve not tried Italian Prune Plums, they are so incredibly delicious. And they are currently in season! Go get em!) Anyway, I got home with my giant bag of plums and realized I didn’t exactly know what to do with all my plums. So, I starting perusing the interwebs for ideas, and I stumbled upon my friend Michelle’s recipe for Sweet Cream Biscuits with Earl Grey Whipped Cream and Plum Jam. I was intrigued and delighted by the recipe, and knew I needed to make my own version.

So, I started by baking a batch of sweet cream biscuits. (I had to know what all the fuss was about, after all. Turns out, they’re totally awesome.) Since I was working with fresh plums (as opposed to plum jam), I had the idea to roast the plums with a bit of brown sugar and olive oil. Lastly, I didn’t have any Earl Grey tea, but I did have a tin of loose leaf Masala Chai Tea. Bingo. And that’s how this dessert was born.

Please note, this dessert is best eaten fresh! Biscuits are a type of quick bread, and they generally don’t keep well. Biscuits really are best the day they are baked, but they’re ok the next day if warmed or toasted.  In general, however, I recommend you make this recipe the day you plan on eating it. (The plums and whipped cream, however, keep nicely in the fridge and are delicious for breakfast the next day…)

sweet cream biscuits with roasted plums and chai whipped cream | rosemarried.com

Sweet Cream Biscuits with Roasted Plums and Chai Infused Whipped Cream

Serving Size: Makes 8-10 biscuits

Ingredients

  • For the Sweet Cream Biscuits:
  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 tablespoon baking powder
  • 3 teaspoons granulated sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1 1/4 cups plus 1 tablespoon heavy cream, chilled

  • For the Chai Spiced Whipped Cream:
  • 1 cup heavy whipping cream
  • 2 tablespoons loose-leaf Chai tea
  • 2 teaspoons powdered sugar

  • For the Roasted Plums:
  • Several ripe Italian prune plums (8-10)
  • 1-2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon light brown sugar

Instructions

  1. To make the Chai whipped cream: In a small bowl or jar, combine 1 cup of whipping cream with the loose leaf Chai tea. Gently stir together and cover the container, and allow to steep in the fridge for 1 hour or more.
  2. After the whipped cream has steeped for an hour, strain out the tea leaves (using a mesh sieve or cheesecloth). Pour the cream into a medium sized bowl (or the bowl of your stand mixer) and add the powdered sugar. Using an electric mixer (or stand mixer), beat the cream on medium-high speed until soft peaks form.
  3. To roast the plums: Preheat oven to 400 F. Wash and halve the plums, removing the pits. Toss plum halves with olive oil and brown sugar. Bake for 10-15 minutes, until plums are browning and releasing their juices. Remove from oven and set aside until use.
  4. To make the Sweet Cream Biscuits: Preheat the oven to 425F. Line a baking sheet with parchment or a Silpat.
  5. In a large bowl, whisk together the flour, baking powder, sugar, and salt until well combined. Pour one cup of the cream over the dry ingredients, using a fork (or your hands) to gently mix the ingredients together. If the mixture is too dry, add more cream, one spoonful at a time, until the dough is soft and moist. Using your hands, gently knead the dough until it just comes together. (Be careful not to overknead!)
  6. Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured surface. Lightly pat the dough into a disc with your hands, until it is 1/2″ thick. (Once again, be sure not overwork the dough!)
  7. Using a biscuit cutter (or juice glass!), cut out the biscuit circles. Be sure to cut the biscuits close together, and get as many as you can from this round. Transfer the biscuits to the prepared baking sheet. Gather the remaining scraps together and gently pat into another 1/2″ disc and cut out another batch of biscuits. (Note: only repeat this process once. Toss any remaining scraps, as dough will be too overworked at this point.)
  8. Once you’ve cut out all your biscuits and placed them on baking sheets, brush the tops of the biscuits with cream. (Optional: you can also sprinkle a bit of sugar atop each biscuit, which I think looks rather pretty.) Bake at 425 for 15-18 minutes, or until the biscuits are fluffy and golden brown. Transfer to a wire rack and allow to cool slightly before serving.

Notes

Adapted from Hummingbird High

http://rosemarried.com/2014/10/07/sweet-cream-biscuits-roasted-plums-chai-infused-whipped-cream/

Peach Cornmeal Skillet Cake with Lavender

I’ve made this recipe a couple of times now, and finally took the time to stop and snap a couple of photos. That’s the problem with delicious desserts, you see. They disappear far too quickly to take photos.

Truth be told, however, this isn’t the most photogenic of cakes. Granted, this recipe is an adaptation of a Martha Stewart recipe. Of course, her version looks absolutely stunning. The peach slices are arranged with care, each one placed perfectly in line. The cake is baked in a skillet, but then is turned out onto a gorgeous serving board. It’s a Martha masterpiece.

peach and cornmeal skillet cake | rosemarried.com

My version isn’t nearly as pretty as Martha’s. And my baby bump accidentally made an appearance in most of the photos. Oops.

 

But, let’s be honest. Who has the time or the energy for that? I certainly don’t.

You know what I did? I sauteed the peach slices in a lot of butter (and sugar!) and left them in the bottom of the skillet. I didn’t arrange them whatsoever. I poured batter on top of the peaches and baked the cake. Then, I ate the cake straight out of the skillet. And you know what? It was damn near perfect. The cake was buttery and moist, and just bursting with juicy summer peaches. The lavender was subtle, yet present, and added a unique and surprising flavor to the cake. It was fantastic.

Sure, it might not be as pretty as Martha’s version, but that’s fine by me. I want to cook attainable food that tastes good. The reality is that most of us are busy people with jobs, kids, pets, sports, mortgages, and all sorts of other responsibilities. We simply don’t have the time to arrange peach slices in concentric circles. And that’s ok.

There’s a time and a place for pretty cakes with pretty peach slices. But there’s also a time for peach cornmeal skillet cakes that are simple, easy, and totally delicious. This is one of those times.

peach and cornmeal skillet cake with lavender | rosemarried.com

Peach Cornmeal Skillet Cake with Lavender

Serving Size: 8

Ingredients

  • 1 stick (plus 3 tablespoons) unsalted butter, room temperature
  • 1 cup light brown sugar
  • 3-4 ripe peaches (skins on), sliced into 3/4″ wedges
  • 1 cup coarse yellow cornmeal
  • 3/4 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 2 teaspoons dried lavender
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 3 large eggs
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1/2 teaspoon nutmeg
  • 1/2 cup heavy cream

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.
  2. In a 9″ or 10″ cast iron skillet, melt 3 tablespoons of butter over medium heat. When butter is bubbling and melted, add in peach slices, nutmeg, and 1/4 cup of the brown sugar, and stir to coat. Reduce heat to low, and allow peaches to cook until most of the juice has boiled off and peaches are beginning to caramelize, about 10 to 12 minutes. Remove from heat.
  3. In a small bowl, whisk together the flour, baking powder, lavender, and salt. In another bowl, beat the remaining butter with 3/4 cup of brown sugar on high speed. Beat until fluffy, about 2-3 minutes. Reduce the speed to medium, and add in the eggs, one at a time. Scrape the sides of the bowl occasionally, and add in vanilla and cream.
  4. Next, pour in the the cornmeal mixture, stirring just to combine. Pour batter over peach slices, using a spatula to spread the batter evenly.
  5. Bake for 20-22 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted into the center of the cake comes out clean. Remove skillet from the oven, and allow cake to cool at least slightly before serving. (I highly recommend serving this cake with a heaping dollop of homemade whipped cream. It’s downright dreamy.)

Notes

Adapted from Martha Stewart

http://rosemarried.com/2014/09/15/peach-cornmeal-skillet-cake-lavender/